Connectivity Infrastructure Plan

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We have a CLEAR vision for transport in West Yorkshire.

Have your say

We want to hear your feedback on our Connectivity Infrastructure Plan. Are we focusing on the right priorities, and vision for Connectivity?

This engagement is now closed, thank you for your feedback. You can view the engagement outcome report and the You Said, We did for Mass Transit here.

Please note: all plans including Mass Transit routes are at an early design stage and no decisions have been made on routes or technology options yet.

For us, planning for West Yorkshire’s transport future is about where we arrive. Our vision for transport goes beyond getting people from A to B. It’s about getting all of us – our people, our communities, our businesses – to where we want to be as a region.

And it’s about getting there in the best way possible. Whether you travel for work and want to discover brilliant new opportunities, or simply seek to enjoy more of our beautiful region, or meet up with the ones you love, we want our transport system to make it happen.

We are seeking views on the transport plans we are developing to turn this vision into reality.

Our transport plans

We want to make our transport system much easier, both to use and to understand. So easy in fact that taking quick, joined-up journeys through walking and cycling and public transport becomes second nature for us all.

We have identified a range of options, informed by our evidence, to create an integrated network bringing walking and cycling, rail, bus and a new mass transit system together.

Our Connectivity Infrastructure Plan sets out a long-term transport infrastructure investment programme for the next 20 years, providing a picture of where improvements are most needed to enhance people’s quality of life and bring investment to the area.

It is built on detailed evidence on the role different types of transport can play:

Our Connectivity Infrastructure Plan is a starting point, not an end and we want your views on how we develop these proposals further.

What happens next?

This Plan, and your feedback on it, is an important early stage in choosing options for our future investment priorities.

We are engaging on these initial proposals now. Responding to engagement feedback, we will review and re-shape our plan in Summer 2021. We will also consider government spending announcements and any further developments for transport investment.

We will then progress the scheme details and estimate costs. This will have further rounds of engagement and evaluation, becoming more rigorous as we move from a long list of options to a preferred option that would be delivered.

Contact us

If you wish to contact us regarding this project you can do so using the following methods. Please be aware that we will operate a reduced staff over the Easter period and therefore there may be a delay in responding to your query.

Email:  connectivity@westyorks-ca.gov.uk

Phone: 0113 245 7676 (Metroline Contact Centre) 

Post: Freepost CONSULTATION TEAM (WYCA)*

*Please be aware that, due to the COVID-19 crisis, the majority of our staff are working from home and therefore there will be significant delays in receiving and responding to post. It is strongly recommended that you contact us via another method if possible. 

We have a CLEAR vision for transport in West Yorkshire.

Have your say

We want to hear your feedback on our Connectivity Infrastructure Plan. Are we focusing on the right priorities, and vision for Connectivity?

This engagement is now closed, thank you for your feedback. You can view the engagement outcome report and the You Said, We did for Mass Transit here.

Please note: all plans including Mass Transit routes are at an early design stage and no decisions have been made on routes or technology options yet.

For us, planning for West Yorkshire’s transport future is about where we arrive. Our vision for transport goes beyond getting people from A to B. It’s about getting all of us – our people, our communities, our businesses – to where we want to be as a region.

And it’s about getting there in the best way possible. Whether you travel for work and want to discover brilliant new opportunities, or simply seek to enjoy more of our beautiful region, or meet up with the ones you love, we want our transport system to make it happen.

We are seeking views on the transport plans we are developing to turn this vision into reality.

Our transport plans

We want to make our transport system much easier, both to use and to understand. So easy in fact that taking quick, joined-up journeys through walking and cycling and public transport becomes second nature for us all.

We have identified a range of options, informed by our evidence, to create an integrated network bringing walking and cycling, rail, bus and a new mass transit system together.

Our Connectivity Infrastructure Plan sets out a long-term transport infrastructure investment programme for the next 20 years, providing a picture of where improvements are most needed to enhance people’s quality of life and bring investment to the area.

It is built on detailed evidence on the role different types of transport can play:

Our Connectivity Infrastructure Plan is a starting point, not an end and we want your views on how we develop these proposals further.

What happens next?

This Plan, and your feedback on it, is an important early stage in choosing options for our future investment priorities.

We are engaging on these initial proposals now. Responding to engagement feedback, we will review and re-shape our plan in Summer 2021. We will also consider government spending announcements and any further developments for transport investment.

We will then progress the scheme details and estimate costs. This will have further rounds of engagement and evaluation, becoming more rigorous as we move from a long list of options to a preferred option that would be delivered.

Contact us

If you wish to contact us regarding this project you can do so using the following methods. Please be aware that we will operate a reduced staff over the Easter period and therefore there may be a delay in responding to your query.

Email:  connectivity@westyorks-ca.gov.uk

Phone: 0113 245 7676 (Metroline Contact Centre) 

Post: Freepost CONSULTATION TEAM (WYCA)*

*Please be aware that, due to the COVID-19 crisis, the majority of our staff are working from home and therefore there will be significant delays in receiving and responding to post. It is strongly recommended that you contact us via another method if possible. 

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Please make sure you take part in the survey and/or interactive map to formally record your feedback in this engagement.

If you have any questions about the project or this engagement, let us know below.

  • Share Dear Sirs Magnets are used extensively by High Speed Trains in the UK to hold the carriages down to the tracks. Such trains are pushed backwards on 50% of their journeys, at120mph, with the power unit at the back, and the carriages at the front still hold down and do not come off the tracks at the many points. In europe there are many examples of trains and trams going up long and very steep hills using the same technology. It is clear that the required technology exists to run a rail connection to the airport up the incline from the existing lines in Horsforth or Apperley Bridge. it is well understood and available. Should this be included in the transport plan and if not why? on Facebook Share Dear Sirs Magnets are used extensively by High Speed Trains in the UK to hold the carriages down to the tracks. Such trains are pushed backwards on 50% of their journeys, at120mph, with the power unit at the back, and the carriages at the front still hold down and do not come off the tracks at the many points. In europe there are many examples of trains and trams going up long and very steep hills using the same technology. It is clear that the required technology exists to run a rail connection to the airport up the incline from the existing lines in Horsforth or Apperley Bridge. it is well understood and available. Should this be included in the transport plan and if not why? on Twitter Share Dear Sirs Magnets are used extensively by High Speed Trains in the UK to hold the carriages down to the tracks. Such trains are pushed backwards on 50% of their journeys, at120mph, with the power unit at the back, and the carriages at the front still hold down and do not come off the tracks at the many points. In europe there are many examples of trains and trams going up long and very steep hills using the same technology. It is clear that the required technology exists to run a rail connection to the airport up the incline from the existing lines in Horsforth or Apperley Bridge. it is well understood and available. Should this be included in the transport plan and if not why? on Linkedin Email Dear Sirs Magnets are used extensively by High Speed Trains in the UK to hold the carriages down to the tracks. Such trains are pushed backwards on 50% of their journeys, at120mph, with the power unit at the back, and the carriages at the front still hold down and do not come off the tracks at the many points. In europe there are many examples of trains and trams going up long and very steep hills using the same technology. It is clear that the required technology exists to run a rail connection to the airport up the incline from the existing lines in Horsforth or Apperley Bridge. it is well understood and available. Should this be included in the transport plan and if not why? link

    Dear Sirs Magnets are used extensively by High Speed Trains in the UK to hold the carriages down to the tracks. Such trains are pushed backwards on 50% of their journeys, at120mph, with the power unit at the back, and the carriages at the front still hold down and do not come off the tracks at the many points. In europe there are many examples of trains and trams going up long and very steep hills using the same technology. It is clear that the required technology exists to run a rail connection to the airport up the incline from the existing lines in Horsforth or Apperley Bridge. it is well understood and available. Should this be included in the transport plan and if not why?

    Jim Spencer asked over 3 years ago

    Many thanks for contacting us and sharing your ideas about high-speed and local transit for the future.  

    You are correct in saying that rail technology is suitable for a wide variety of speed ranges and can operate on significant gradients, beyond those which are common at present in Britain.  As you suggest, this is a mature technology with an excellent safety record.  In fact, in the majority of cases (the main exceptions being a small number of specialised short-distance mountain lines such as in the Alps), such railways and tramways rely on the “conventional” rail principle of the adhesion of the steel wheel on the steel rail.  Magnets are occasionally also used as a supplementary form of braking, such as for emergencies.  

    With regard to the specific situation of Leeds – Bradford Airport, we would confirm that consideration has been given to a direct rail link (whether standard mainline “heavy” rail or light rail / tram-train).  However, the conclusion was reached that a “parkway” station for the airport is the most appropriate here in the short and medium terms, having regard to technical compatibility with the wider transport network, physical deliverability, financial affordability, environmental impact, and the optimum way to serve the variety of potential markets identified (including acting as a local park-and-ride hub).  

    We hope you find this information helpful. 

  • Share Would like clarity on the cross border consultation of cycle and bus routes. Also where kirklees / bradford and other boroughs are building extensively have we looked at the school places as far as pupils being able to access schools they can walk / cycle to to cut car transportation on Facebook Share Would like clarity on the cross border consultation of cycle and bus routes. Also where kirklees / bradford and other boroughs are building extensively have we looked at the school places as far as pupils being able to access schools they can walk / cycle to to cut car transportation on Twitter Share Would like clarity on the cross border consultation of cycle and bus routes. Also where kirklees / bradford and other boroughs are building extensively have we looked at the school places as far as pupils being able to access schools they can walk / cycle to to cut car transportation on Linkedin Email Would like clarity on the cross border consultation of cycle and bus routes. Also where kirklees / bradford and other boroughs are building extensively have we looked at the school places as far as pupils being able to access schools they can walk / cycle to to cut car transportation link

    Would like clarity on the cross border consultation of cycle and bus routes. Also where kirklees / bradford and other boroughs are building extensively have we looked at the school places as far as pupils being able to access schools they can walk / cycle to to cut car transportation

    Mark S Thompson asked about 3 years ago

    Thank you for your query. 

    Last summer we piloted our approach to Local Cycling and Walking Implementation Plans across all five of the districts. Whilst this included a couple of cross-boundary schemes, generally we were exploring the methodology and how best to engage on the process within each district by trying out a single scheme in each district. These are available on our website as part of the Connectivity Plan consultation. We have learnt from the experience and are now rolling out a far bigger Phase Two of the process which is identifying not only five more key routes (and the changes needed to keep cyclist safe) in each district but also further interventions around these routs to enable safe access to them from the surrounding areas. Although this process ahs only just begun, it is the first step in building a pipeline of schemes for us to put forward for funding as and when this comes available. We are working with Sustrans and the Canal and Rivers Trust to make sure that all of our networks, recreational and utility, on- and off-road work together as a coherent and cohesive whole. This includes making sure that across boundaries we have agreed routes and approaches to ensure that routes don’t stop randomly at boundaries or have a transition from one approach (fully segregated) to another, less effective approach. We’ll be consulting on these schemes over the coming months and years as they come through the pipeline, both at early stages (are we connecting the right places?) and later in the development process (are we connecting them the right way?) but schools are very much a key aspect of our route definition process. Making it easier for kids to cycle to and from school independently, or for parents to cycle their children to school is important in making cycling a viable, attractive and useful form of transport for a wide range of users and so we aim to connect schools with their catchment areas wherever we can. We are supporting this both at a Combined Authority and local council level with local School Streets interventions, where we close streets around schools at the start and end of the day to make sure that streets are safer for children and parents, but also to encourage people to consider alternatives to car-based mobility for picking up or dropping off their children. For more information on the plans I encourage you to click the link below. Scroll to the bottom of the page to see links  to the LCWIP for each of the five districts. www.westyorks-ca.gov.uk/improving-transport/walking-and-cycling-strategy 

    We hope this answered your question. If you have any further questions about active travel, please let us know. 

    Thank you!

  • Share Hello, Please can you share the full suite of survey questions with me if possible - word doc or pdf is fine. It would just allow a bit more thinking time before making a response. Kind Regards, Laura Emmerson on Facebook Share Hello, Please can you share the full suite of survey questions with me if possible - word doc or pdf is fine. It would just allow a bit more thinking time before making a response. Kind Regards, Laura Emmerson on Twitter Share Hello, Please can you share the full suite of survey questions with me if possible - word doc or pdf is fine. It would just allow a bit more thinking time before making a response. Kind Regards, Laura Emmerson on Linkedin Email Hello, Please can you share the full suite of survey questions with me if possible - word doc or pdf is fine. It would just allow a bit more thinking time before making a response. Kind Regards, Laura Emmerson link

    Hello, Please can you share the full suite of survey questions with me if possible - word doc or pdf is fine. It would just allow a bit more thinking time before making a response. Kind Regards, Laura Emmerson

    LE asked over 3 years ago

    Thank you for your query. We have now uploaded a pdf version of the survey onto the dedicated Your Voice page. You can view and download the survey here: Connectivity Plan - Questionnaire (amazonaws.com)  or by going to the Documents section and Additional documents folder on the Your Voice page: www.yourvoice.westyorks-ca.gov.uk/connectivity.  

Page last updated: 21 Oct 2022, 02:50 PM