Innovation Framework

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Innovation for everyone 

Innovation is key to economic growth and success but it’s even more important as part of an economic recovery. Businesses creating new and improved products and processes, adapting their existing products or markets or diversifying their offer are all examples of innovations that are critical to our economic recovery post-COVID. To drive that economic growth we need to see:

  • more of our businesses doing more exciting, proactive innovation
  • more new innovation led entrepreneurs setting up businesses
  • more businesses adopting tried and tested methods to improve productivity
  • more individuals from diverse backgrounds involved in innovation

And whilst we are trying to achieve economic growth, we want innovation to be framed by doing social good, solving some of our biggest societal challenges.

Innovation is quite often an abstract word, but whilst we might not instantly realise it, innovation is at the heart of all our lives. Whether it’s AI algorithms helping to predict and prevent suicide, tracking technology to support dementia patients to stay in their own homes, technology supporting logistics and transport to track your Christmas presents from the warehouse to your door or solar powered tents to help the homeless – the list is endless.

But most of these examples of innovations – the application of new products or processes – have been created by a small proportion of society.

Here are just two statistics: only 15 per cent of scientists come from working class backgrounds; and in the US, children from the top 1 per cent of richest families (by income) are ten times as likely to have filed for a patent as those from families in the bottom half of the income distribution. We want to change that.

We want to make sure that the innovation process involves people from all walks of life, and whilst we understand that this isn’t going to happen overnight, there are some things we can do now to engage with a more diverse population.

This will ensure that innovations are developed and designed by the people who will be using them. Take for example the car seatbelt - women are 47% more likely to suffer severe injuries in car crashes because safety features are designed for men.

To set out these innovation ambitions we are developing the Leeds City Region Innovation Framework to help motivate all the key players in this space into action and provide a framework for future investment.

These high-level ambitions are guided by the evidence that suggests we are not fulfilling our potential. By engaging a greater range of individuals and businesses in the business of innovation, we can begin to change that.


The Innovation Framework

Between 21 October and 4 November we asked you to tell us five words that best describe what innovation means to you. We have used your feedback to help us develop a draft framework that highlights our vision and priorities for the future of innovation across the region. You can view a summary of this Innovation Framework and the results of the pre-engagement using the links below. You can also view a detailed information pack containing evidence that highlights the need for improved and inclusive innovation.


Public Engagement

Between 25 November and 23 December we held a period of public engagement to gather the views of the public and businesses. The feedback we received during this period is now being analysed and further information will be posted here when available.

Contact us 

Via our Q&A tool: Click the Q&A button at the bottom of this page

Via email:yourvoice@westyorks-ca.gov.uk 

Via phone: 0113 245 7676 (Metroline Contact Centre)

Via post: Freepost CONSULTATION TEAM (WYCA)* 


*Please note that, due to the COVID-19 crisis, the majority of our staff are working from home and therefore there will be significant delays in receiving any postal contributions. It is strongly recommended that you contact us via another method if possible. 


Innovation for everyone 

Innovation is key to economic growth and success but it’s even more important as part of an economic recovery. Businesses creating new and improved products and processes, adapting their existing products or markets or diversifying their offer are all examples of innovations that are critical to our economic recovery post-COVID. To drive that economic growth we need to see:

  • more of our businesses doing more exciting, proactive innovation
  • more new innovation led entrepreneurs setting up businesses
  • more businesses adopting tried and tested methods to improve productivity
  • more individuals from diverse backgrounds involved in innovation

And whilst we are trying to achieve economic growth, we want innovation to be framed by doing social good, solving some of our biggest societal challenges.

Innovation is quite often an abstract word, but whilst we might not instantly realise it, innovation is at the heart of all our lives. Whether it’s AI algorithms helping to predict and prevent suicide, tracking technology to support dementia patients to stay in their own homes, technology supporting logistics and transport to track your Christmas presents from the warehouse to your door or solar powered tents to help the homeless – the list is endless.

But most of these examples of innovations – the application of new products or processes – have been created by a small proportion of society.

Here are just two statistics: only 15 per cent of scientists come from working class backgrounds; and in the US, children from the top 1 per cent of richest families (by income) are ten times as likely to have filed for a patent as those from families in the bottom half of the income distribution. We want to change that.

We want to make sure that the innovation process involves people from all walks of life, and whilst we understand that this isn’t going to happen overnight, there are some things we can do now to engage with a more diverse population.

This will ensure that innovations are developed and designed by the people who will be using them. Take for example the car seatbelt - women are 47% more likely to suffer severe injuries in car crashes because safety features are designed for men.

To set out these innovation ambitions we are developing the Leeds City Region Innovation Framework to help motivate all the key players in this space into action and provide a framework for future investment.

These high-level ambitions are guided by the evidence that suggests we are not fulfilling our potential. By engaging a greater range of individuals and businesses in the business of innovation, we can begin to change that.


The Innovation Framework

Between 21 October and 4 November we asked you to tell us five words that best describe what innovation means to you. We have used your feedback to help us develop a draft framework that highlights our vision and priorities for the future of innovation across the region. You can view a summary of this Innovation Framework and the results of the pre-engagement using the links below. You can also view a detailed information pack containing evidence that highlights the need for improved and inclusive innovation.


Public Engagement

Between 25 November and 23 December we held a period of public engagement to gather the views of the public and businesses. The feedback we received during this period is now being analysed and further information will be posted here when available.

Contact us 

Via our Q&A tool: Click the Q&A button at the bottom of this page

Via email:yourvoice@westyorks-ca.gov.uk 

Via phone: 0113 245 7676 (Metroline Contact Centre)

Via post: Freepost CONSULTATION TEAM (WYCA)* 


*Please note that, due to the COVID-19 crisis, the majority of our staff are working from home and therefore there will be significant delays in receiving any postal contributions. It is strongly recommended that you contact us via another method if possible. 


Page last updated: 24 December 2020, 08:02